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Products liability claim filed re IVC filter that pierces vein

Patients in West Virginia and elsewhere rely on the manufacturers of medical devices to properly test a product before it is released for use. These devices are used to treat countless medical conditions, many of which are implanted in a patient, even if only temporarily. A woman in another state has recently filed a products liability lawsuit against the manufacturers of a removable IVC filter.

The filter was implanted to assist in capturing and preventing potential blood clots from reaching her heart or lungs. Although the device was intended to be removable, the first attempt to do so revealed that it had become embedded in the wall of the vein. In addition, the device had apparently tilted, and several of its wires had pierced the vein.

After a second attempted also failed, the device was eventually removed by surgeons in a third attempt, who reportedly confirmed that the vein had been perforated. She claims to have experienced a great deal of pain and suffering in the process, as well as a growing concern for her future well-being. According to reports, the manufacturers of the device are currently facing numerous lawsuits in relation to the filter.

Defective medical devices are often dangerous and can lead to long-term or permanent damage to the health of a patient. Those who are harmed by such a device may often seek accountability from the party believed responsible, but the process can be complex. A person in West Virginia who is seriously injured by such a device could speak with an experienced attorney for assistance in pursuing the compensation deserved through a products liability claim.

Source: dailyhornet.com, “IVC Filter Lawsuit Filed Over Vein Perforation & Failed Retrieval“, June 22, 2017

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