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Speeding major factor in motor vehicle accidents involving teens

West Virginia readers know that teenage drivers often lack the experience and capacity to make mature, safe and practical decisions behind the wheel. This particular age group is especially likely to be involved in motor vehicle accidents caused by speeding or other preventable behaviors, including distraction. In fact, speed is in the top five main reasons teenagers are involved in fatal accidents.

According to a newly released report from AAA, there are been approximately 14,000 fatal accidents that involved teenagers. Of that number, it is estimated that 4,200 involved speeding. While teens have been involved in a high number of accidents, people in other cars or innocent passengers often pay the toll for their irresponsible behavior. Many driving instructors think that parents are not instructing their children on safe driving habits.

It is believed that teens pick up many habits and behaviors after watching their parents do the same thing for years. This includes distracting driving, such as texting or talking on the phone, or speeding more than 15 miles per hour above the posted speed limit. It is critical for West Virginia drivers to set good examples for their children, even years before they start driving.

The damage done in motor vehicle accidents cannot be reversed, and parents would be wise to instruct their children on safe driving habits. When teens injure or harm another person while behind the wheel, the parent or owner of the vehicle may be liable for damages. Victims of car accidents involving teenagers may have legal options, even if the responsible individual is a minor.

Source: nbcsandiego.com, “Speeding Listed as Top Mistake in Fatal Accidents Involving Teen Drivers“, Jaspreet Kaur, Oct. 12, 2016

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