Stryker Hip System

Recalled Stryker Rejuvenate And ABG II Modular Primary Hip Replacement Systems

In November, 2009, Stryker Orthopaedics began marketing the ABG II Modular Hip System. Stryker claimed the modular implantable necks were especially useful in dysplasia cases. The necks were made from GADS Vitallium, a proprietary CoCr (cobalt and chromium) alloy that Stryker developed. GADS stands for Gas Atomized Dispersion Strengthened. The CoCr alloy was touted as featuring high performances in terms of corrosion resistance and improved fatigue strength (with respect to regular CoCr alloy).

In February, 2010, Stryker Orthopaedics began marketing the Rejuvenate Modular Primary Hip System. According to Stryker, the rejuvenate hip was designed to recreate the anatomy and the biomechanics of individual patients. Striker claimed the Rejuvenate hip provided enhanced stability, proven modularity and intra-operative flexibility.

However, Stryker's claims were short lived.

On July 6, 2012, Stryker announced a voluntary recall of its Rejuvenate and ABG II Modular Neck stems used during hip replacement surgery. The problem with the design may be related to corrosion at the metal joint between the modular neck and the femoral stem. If this corrosion is present, it could lead to significant amounts of dangerous cobalt and chromium metal ions being released into the surrounding tissues and blood stream. These dangerous metal ions can lead to serious medical conditions including, but not limited to, tissue necrosis (death) and pseudotumor formation.

If you have received a Rejuvenate or ABG II Modular Hip System you may have a claim for money damages. Please contact James C. Peterson, Esq., or Aaron L. Harrah, Esq., for a free consultation regarding your Modular Hip System.