Medtronic Defibrillators


Medtronic Defibrillators And Cardioverters

PLEASE NOTE: The class-action litigation is completed and we are no longer accepting cases for Medtronic Defibrillators.

What is an implanted defibrillator?

An implantable defibrillator is an electronic device implanted in the body and intended to prevent cardiac arrest from severe ventricular tachycardia. An electrode is connected between the heart and a tiny computer in the defibrillator. The computer monitors the heartbeat, and if it detects an arrhythmia, it activates a built-in pacemaker to re-stabilize the heart's rhythm. If that fails, it delivers a small defibrillating electrical jolt to the heart. In an extreme case, it resorts to a far stronger jolt to reset the heart rate.

Who is Medtronic?

Medtronic refers to itself as the world's leading medical technology company. It is a major manufacturer of implantable medical devices, including defibrillators. Its headquarters is in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

What is the problem with Medtronic defibrillators?

In February 2005 Medtronic announced that several of its implantable defibrillators can fail suddenly, because they have defective batteries. Device failure can result in sudden death. The bad batteries were put into devices in 2001, 2002 and 2003.

What models are defective?

Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator models:
Marquis VR 7230
Marquis DR 7274
Maximo VR 7232
Maximo DR 7278


Cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillators:
InSync I Marquis
InSync II Marquis
InSync III Marquis
InSync III Protect 7277
InSync III Protect 7289

Who has a claim?

1. Anyone with one of the models listed above that failed, resulting in uncontrolled ventricular tachycardia requiring documented medical care, who survived the incident, has a claim for injuries and a claim for the cost of taking out the defective defibrillator, the cost of replacement, and the cost of implanting the replacement.

2. The family of a person with one of the models listed above that failed resulting in death has a claim for wrongful death.

3. A person with one of the models above that has not failed has a claim for the cost of taking out the defective defibrillator, the cost of replacement, and the cost of implanting the replacement.